News

Latest News
Updated: 43 min 42 sec ago

Rising temperatures harm worker productivity, causing global losses

Thu, 08/30/2018 - 18:47
From Montreal to Mount Washington, heat records are being broken this summer in places not accustomed to sweltering temperatures. Studies have found that unusually hot weather is linked to lower economic output in countries around the world. Although several factors—from poor crop yields to heat-related illnesses—probably share part of the blame, there is also a more fundamental variable at play: When we get hot, we find it difficult to work. “Because human physiology is the same whether you...

University of Chicago holds Belfast conference on global conflict

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 15:20
The University of Chicago and Queen's University Belfast today concluded Global Conflict | The Human Impact in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Hosted by The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts at the University of Chicago and The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice at Queen's University Belfast, the conference saw leading voices engage in two days of conversation focused on strategies for resolving violent conflict and reducing...

Storytelling, games help young people discuss sexual health

Wed, 07/11/2018 - 13:40
For young people, discussing sexual and reproductive health can be awkward. In certain parts of the world, those conversations can be downright stigmatizing. Through multimedia approaches, storytelling and innovative research, the University of Chicago’s Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation in Sexual and Reproductive Health (Ci3) is helping young people find ways to tell their everyday stories. Kissa Kahani is a multi-year international project funded by a Bill & Melinda Gates...

Workshop strengthens bonds between UChicago, African scholars

Tue, 06/19/2018 - 14:36
Despite accounting for 15 percent of the world’s population and one-quarter of its disease burden, Africa provides only about 2 percent of global research. However, as African nations and economies grow, so too has the opportunity for training and supporting new scientists, physicians, and institutions to work on local and international problems. For decades, University of Chicago faculty have built professional partnerships with African scholars. But a UChicago workshop sou­­­­ght to weave...

UChicago appointed co-commissioner of U.S. Pavilion at Venice Architecture Biennale

Tue, 06/19/2018 - 14:36
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago jointly announced today their selection by the U.S. Department of State to serve as co-commissioners of the United States Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale . As co-commissioners, the two institutions will organize Dimensions of Citizenship, the exhibition they proposed as the official United States contribution to the 16th International Architecture Exhibition, on view from May 26 through Nov. 25, 2018. The...

Virtual Earth-sized telescope aims to capture first image of a black hole

Tue, 06/19/2018 - 14:36
A powerful network of telescopes around the Earth is attempting to create the first image of a black hole, an elusive gravitational sinkhole that Albert Einstein first predicted in 1915. The UChicago-led South Pole Telescope is part of the Event Horizon Telescope , which combines eight observatories in six locations to create a virtual Earth-sized telescope so powerful it could spot a nickel on the surface of the moon. Scientists spent ten days in April gathering data on Sagittarius A*, a black...

Yoichiro Nambu, Nobel-winning theoretical physicist, 1921-2015

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Physicist Yoichiro Nambu once said he came to the University of Chicago in 1954 because of the “many great names” in physics at the University, including Nobel laureates such as Enrico Fermi. Nambu became a major figure in his own right during his long tenure at UChicago, culminating in winning a share of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics for his theory about the workings of the subatomic world. Nambu, 94, died on July 5 in Osaka, Japan, after an acute heart attack. His death was announced July 17...

Observing Chinese Starbucks patrons reveals what their ancestors farmed, study finds

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
A new study analyzing behavior patterns of people across China suggests that the traditional interdependent rice-farming culture of southern China has resulted in today's residents—even city dwellers far removed from farming—being more interdependent and less controlling over their environment compared to their countrymen who hail from the more independent wheat-farming culture of northern China. The University of Chicago Booth School of Business study was conducted by Thomas Talhelm, assistant...

China’s ‘war against pollution’ shows promising results, study finds

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
As China marks its four-year anniversary of declaring “war against pollution,” a new analysis using data from more than 200 government monitors throughout the country finds air pollution has decreased across the board in China’s most populated areas. Cities on average have cut concentrations of fine particulates—widely considered the deadliest form of air pollution—by 32 percent in just four years. “The data is in—China is winning its war against pollution,” said Michael Greenstone, the Milton...

Fourth-year earns scholarship to pursue medical degree, global leadership program

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Ade Ayoola, a fourth-year student in the College, has been selected as one of 49 inaugural Knight-Hennessy Scholars at Stanford University. Ayoola will receive full funding to pursue a medical degree from the Stanford School of Medicine while participating in the scholarship’s global leadership program. The new scholarship program aims to provide a new generation of global leaders with the skills to develop solutions to the world’s most complicated challenges. The cohort of scholars was selected...

Neubauer Collegium faculty projects explore themes across academic fields

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Digital censorship, democracy in India and ancient curses are just some of the topics that UChicago faculty will explore as part of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society ’s 2018-19 cycle of collaborative research projects, announced today. This year’s projects, as in previous years, include collaborations with scholars and practitioners from other institutions in the United States and abroad. In its first six years, the Neubauer Collegium will have supported 80 projects led by 143...

Sociologist’s research on Filipino leader reveals insights into populist politics

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
By many accounts, Joseph Estrada had a lackluster record of helping the poor in the Philippines. The former president was ousted in 2001 and later convicted of plunder for stealing $80 million from the government. Nevertheless, the urban poor in Manila have continued to support the former film actor, who ran for president in 2010 after being pardoned. In an attempt to better understand the source of voters’ loyalty to Estrada, Marco Garrido, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology,...

Fourth-year student named Rhodes scholar

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Lucas Tse, a fourth-year student in the College, has earned a Rhodes Scholarship for Hong Kong to study at the University of Oxford next fall. He hopes to pursue an MPhil in economic and social history, with aspirations for a career as a scholar and educator. “There are ideals in both directions that attract me,” Tse wrote in an email from Hong Kong, where he has lived for 19 years and where he was visiting family. “I would like to further my academic training and take on the challenges of...

Exhibition studies U.S. international relations through architecture

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
After the brutality of World War II, the United States sought to usher in a new era of optimism in the late 1940’s through an ambitious embassy program that called on some of the greatest architects of the century to design buildings that represented a new foreign policy of openness, dialogue and progress. Those efforts are now the central theme of the latest exhibition at the Neubauer Collegium entitled Havana Case Study , which runs now through Dec. 15, 2017. It is one of several programs that...

Air pollution cuts three years off lifespans in northern China

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Editor’s note: This story has been translated into Chinese . There are currently an estimated 4.5 billion people around the world exposed to levels of particulate air pollution that are at least twice what the World Health Organization considers safe. Yet the impact of sustained exposure to pollution on a person’s life expectancy has largely remained a vexingly unanswered question—until now. A study published Sept. 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that a Chinese...

Living in poverty puts demands on attention that impair decision-making

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
If the interest rate banks paid on customers’ deposits were to soar from 0.3 percent to 5 percent, you would expect that most people would start saving more. But, it turns out, most people aren’t that calculating. In a recent field experiment in Chile, a large majority of people did not increase their savings in response to the higher interest rate. But when their peers were watching, savings almost doubled when the participants in the experiment announced their savings goals to a self-help...

Smart Museum exhibition crowd-sources blankets for art-based activism

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Boxes of blankets began pouring into the Smart Museum of Art over the summer, hundreds a week, bearing postmarks from Ohio, Arizona, Washington, Massachusetts and beyond. They arrived as part of Welcome Blanket , a project from designer and artist Jayna Zweiman that recasts the roughly 2,000-mile distance of the proposed border wall between the United States and Mexico into handmade blankets. Representing the distance of the wall in lengths of yarn—over 3,000 blankets to be knit from 3,500,640...

Regional support for rebel groups can increase violence, study shows

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
The news is filled with stories about insurgencies—about terrorist attacks, the groups perpetrating them and the steps taken to defeat their fighters. However, there’s a tendency to look at just one country at a time when trying to find solutions, not at the relationship of the country attacked with those that surround it, and little is known about trans-national insurgent activities. Luis R. Martinez, assistant professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, shows in a...

Studying lists of last names reveal hiring practices in higher education

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Using lists of names collected from publicly available websites, two University of Chicago researchers have revealed distinctive patterns in higher education systems, ranging from ethnic representation and gender imbalance in the sciences, to the presence of academic couples, and even the illegal hiring of relatives in Italian universities. “This study was an exercise in exploiting bare-bones techniques,” said author Stefano Allesina , professor of ecology and evolution and a member of the...

University statement on climate and the environment

Mon, 06/18/2018 - 16:25
Understanding the scale and nature of the scientific, environmental, economic, policy and public health aspects of climate change demands evidence-based research in an environment of free and open inquiry. The University of Chicago and affiliated laboratories such as the Marine Biological Laboratory remain deeply committed to supporting faculty, students and researchers addressing these important issues from diverse perspectives. These efforts include, but are not limited to, modeling climate...

Pages